Civic Science Round-tables: Teen Dialogues on Sports-Related Brain Injury

When: April 18, 2019, 12:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Where: MassBio/MassBioEd Offices, 300 Technology Square, 8th Floor, Cambridge, Massachusetts

This event is designed to engage high school students in discussions on sports-related brain injury (SRBI) with the goal of supporting important decisions they may face that are directly related.

This event is designed to engage high school students in discussions on sports-related brain injury (SRBI) with the goal of supporting important decisions they may face that are directly related to this topic. Participants will first engage in open conversation with an expert to learn the science of sports-related brain injury. We will then facilitate peer to peer, facilitated conversations, where participants can hear a diverse range of opinions and perspectives about this topic, share their thoughts related to participation in sports and explore concerns around sports-related brain injury. The goals of this Roundtable dialogue are to: Provide an opportunity for teens with diverse views and backgrounds to speak openly about a controversial science-based issue and to seek a better understanding of their own views, and those of others, as they thoughtfully consider how we as individuals and as a society should address them. Engage participants in well-informed, evidence-based discussions that will bring diverse values, opinions and beliefs into the conversation on sports-related brain injury. Deepen an understanding of the scientific evidence, social values and personal experience that are important in making important decisions about sports-related brain injury. Communicate that while science information is very important, it is not sufficient to tell us what choices we might make on science issues with social and personal dimensions. To create an environment for an exchange of ideas through inclusive dialogue that connects science to daily choices and decisions that teens now face. Dialogues will be conducted such that parents/teachers/administrators are separate from youth.

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